Emotion: Anticipation

Anticipation
Anticipation, a photomanipulation by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

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Glorious desires
to soar fresh wisps of heavens.
Awaiting next year!
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Have a very HAPPY NEW YEAR!
(Click here for a New Year greeting on my creativity blog.)

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Emotion: Irritable

Irritable Haiga
Irritable Haiga, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (Click on photo to enlarge)

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Fluttering embers
Glowing, traversing vigor.
Prodding annoyance.
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When I saw these two, it seemed like the duck facing us was irritated by the other duck.

Other postings in my “Emotion:” series:

Emotion: Fear

Peek-A-Boo
Peek-A-Boo, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (Click on photo to enlarge)

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Quivering glances
Timid trust pleads for shutters
Mind-blast softens fright
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This is the third photo in my emotion series.  In reality, this bumble-bee seemed to be unconcerned about my presence.  As long as I didn’t disturb it or approach too closely, it just went about its business.   The results of this shot evoked some subtle feelings of hesitation and even trepidation, so I decided to enhance those feelings with some motion blur.

Related postings on “Emotion:” in this blog:

Emotion: DoWnS and uPs

DoWnS and uPs
DoWnS and uPs, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.
(click on photo to enlarge)

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Lows – deep, dark, lonely
Sweet and sour emotions
Highs – rare, swift, feeble
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Here is another photo in my “emotion” series.  (see my posting on anger).  I saw a flower that had both droopy petals and lively petals, and thought I could use it to represent the experience of being on a rollercoaster ride of emotions.  Although, it could also apply to other rollercoaster challenges one is experiencing.  Obviously, I manipulated the photo and added some unnatural blurring to the flower to evoke the feeling I was looking for – instability even when experiencing the “ups.”

Body Awareness – Notice the details

Notice the details - Haiga
Notice the details – Haiga, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (Click on photo to enlarge)
This is my first submission to Kim Klassen’s Texture Tuesday

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Whispers of guidance
Subtle taps at awareness
Enlightened healing!
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The foot feels the foot when it feels the ground ~ Buddha

My previous posting on mindfulness meditation touched on the benefits of becoming more aware of the physical feelings in your body, both large and small.  Also, when you pay attention to and study your body, you begin to notice the physical sensations that occur in your body during a particular experience or emotion.

If you ask people what they feel in their body when they experience a certain emotion, a response you might get is, “I don’t know, I’ve never thought about it.”  People generally are not aware of these details. More

Go with the F L O W

The creative process is a process of surrender, not control. — Julia Cameron

Skipper in the moment
Skipper in the moment, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (Click on photo to enlarge)

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Flow with the river
Float with the breeze, bathe in bliss
Notice nothing else
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In my last post, I cited that getting lost in an activity could be considered a type of meditation for me, which allows an escape from some of the pain.  I can get lost in certain music, artwork, photographing nature, etc.  This is described as Flow psychology (or being present in the moment).  It involves being fully immersed and absorbed in an activity to the point you are oblivious to everything else.  It is being connected to an activity, to a moment.  The expert on this is Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a psychologist and educator who emigrated from Europe to the United States in the 1950’s.  (I’m  unable to pronounce his name correctly.)

The skipper butterfly in the photo above is a good example of Flow, in my opinion.  This butterfly was so absorbed in drinking nectar from the flower that it was totally oblivious to me.  I stroked its wings, I nudged it back and forth, I put the camera right in its face, which is how I got such a closeup shot, and it did not budge or fly away until it was done.  Great Flow!  Working on getting this photo and enhancing it afterwards was Flow for me.

What activity is Flow for you?

These wings have a story to tell

Tattered wings
Tattered Wings, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (Click on photo to enlarge)

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Frayed wings reveal grief
Heart desires pristine respite
Mind soldiers forward
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This butterfly must have quite a story to tell.  It seems to have been through a lot, but it’s still pretty.  It reminded me of a program I saw recently on monarch butterflies.  One of the segments showed a butterfly after a very long migration northward.  She had just finished laying her eggs on a milkweed and was trying to fly away.  Her wings were tattered and transparent; her colors and design were faded; she was weak and could barely fly.  What a journey they have.

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