Emotion: Discouraged

Discouraged
Discouraged, a photo by Fergiemoto on Flickr.  (click on photo to enlarge)

>>:::<<
Vicissitudes swarm
Thriving on a carousel
Dreams evaporate
>>:::<<

Finch:  “What!?  The other birds didn’t leave me any birdseed.  Bummer!  That’s discouraging.”

(Chronic ailments holding you back, leaving you feeling isolated?  Healing taking a long time?  Struggles visit unexpectedly or overstaying their welcome?  Many situations can leave a person feeling discouraged.)  I’m using one of my artwork “tools” again to help address emotions.  See my posting on Addressing Emotional Pain #2 – Tools.

Related article:

Other postings in my “Emotion:” series:

Addressing Emotional Pain #3 – Body Awareness

Notice the details - Haiga

Today, I expand on my earlier postings on body awareness as a tool for addressing emotional pain.  I’ve learned many important and enlightening things during my treatment sessions, which I share here…and yes, they are helping.

  • “Emotion Focus Therapy” – Becoming more aware of the complexity and nature of feelings.
  • “Mindfulness” – Noticing what you are feeling and where you are feeling certain emotions in the body.
  • Emotion Focus Therapy and Mindfulness go hand in hand.  You have to be mindful of the body to identify what emotions are present.
  • Identifying emotions combined with body awareness helps get to the core of issues and feelings.   Understanding emotions helps to realize what needs changing so they don’t persist and perpetuate a problem in the body.
  • Body awareness helps address and process emotions, and gives the associated energy an outlet.
  • Gradual exposure to an emotion, such as with body awareness, will lessen the intensity and lead to a greater understanding of what is happening.
  • Emotions can motivate people to take action and address them.
  • Every emotion has a corresponding physical manifestation.  This means that there is some sensation in the body occurring at the same time as the emotion (“I’m so sad my heart hurts.”  “I’m so angry my stomach is churning” etc.).  There can also be a chemical change in the body.  Hence:
  • The mind and body are connected.  They are in harmony to protect you and are not fighting against each other.  “Dualism is dead!”
  • Remember, “It’s natural to have emotional ups and downs,” per Dr. Andrew Weil on Spontaneous Happiness. More

Addressing Emotional Pain #2 – Tools

Emotion is the chief source of all becoming-conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion.  ~ Carl Jung

The key message from my last posting was that emotions, painful ones, need to be represented and processed – they need an outlet.  Emotions in general are natural, and they are going to happen.  If you try to stop, distract, dismiss,or suppress them, they just find another way to show up.  Pain tells us something needs attention.

Since I don’t require medication, and cannot take them anyway, I prefer to use tools to address emotions.  Here, I will share some of what I have learned.  Many are a repeat or a variation of the tools I listed for addressing physical pain, but I will list them anyway.  There are several, but in my opinion, you can never have too many good tools in your toolbox.  Some tools are used more than others, some work better than others given the situation, sometimes you need a combination of tools, and others are used infrequently, but it sure is nice to have them when you need them.  Everyone needs to find what works best for them with proper guidance from a healthcare provider.

Remember:  Distracting an emotion is like taking an aspirin – it just masks the symptoms and doesn’t get at the root.  Eventually, the aspirin wears off and the pain returns.

Tools

  • Talk to some you can confide in 100% – Talking and expressing your feelings is a key tool, and the most important for me.  To be effective, the person you talk to needs to give you their full attention and genuinely want to listen. More

Addressing Emotional Pain #1

”Tears expand you, they don’t diminish you.” ~ Michael Ondaatje
“We are expanded by tears, not reduced by them.” ~ anon

I’ve learned many important things about pain, physical and emotional, in my various treatment sessions over the last year and a half.  I will share more of them here and in later postings.

If you experience pain, have you heard things like:  “It’s all in your head.”; “It’s psychological.”; “You have a low tolerance for pain.”; “You’re not handling pain very well.”; “Pull yourself together and quit complaining.”; “Tough it out.”; “Quit crying.”;  etc.

If so, how did that make you feel?  Did you feel like it was an attempt to minimize what you are experiencing, or that the person didn’t care about how you were feeling?  In my opinion, those and similar statements would hinder communication and trust at a time when support and encouragement are needed.  Did you feel like you were weak and that you needed to be a “stronger” person?  Read the quote at the top of this post again. More

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